Today’s Top 5: #Remember911

wtc82Every other day of the week, month, year and decade began the same as it did that Tuesday morning. I rolled out of bed, communed with the cat, made and drank coffee, and hopped online for a spell. That meant, at the time, checking my email, reading the latest digests from the Rust List and Lee Shore (Neil Young and CSN email groups), and then scanning the headlines on MSNBC (now NBCNews), CNN and the Philly Inquirer. It’s a routine I still keep, actually, though the email groups have been replaced by Facebook and, some days, Twitter.

Weather-wise, it was a nice late-summer/pre-fall day in the Delaware Valley; by the time I left for work, a few minutes before 9am, it was in the mid-60s. The car radio was tuned to KYW-1060, the all-news radio station; I hadn’t even backed out into the street before learning that a plane had crashed into the north tower of the World Trade Center. It was thought to have been a tragic accident involving a small plane. Minutes later, news broke that another plane had crashed into the south tower.

My main memory of the day: watching the tragedy unfold on a TV in the chief assignment editor’s high-walled cubicle office. It was beyond comprehension. It still is.

For today’s Top 5: #Remember911. The first four videos come from the America: A Tribute to Heroes broadcast, which aired 10 days later. The last comes from U2’s halftime performance at the 2002 Super Bowl.

1) Bruce Springsteen – “My City of Ruins”

2) Alicia Keys – “Someday We’ll All Be Free”

3) Dixie Chicks – “I Believe in Love”

4) Neil Young – “Imagine”

5) U2 – “Where the Streets Have No Name”

And two bonuses (also from America: A Tribute to Heroes)…

6) Mariah Carey – “Hero”

7) Sheryl Crow – “Safe and Sound”

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2 thoughts on “Today’s Top 5: #Remember911

  1. Todd Mason

    I arose, had flipped on the tv for the bulletins as I got breakfast, and heard about a small plane apparently hitting the first tower just before I went to catch the bus that would take me to the train station (my car was in the shop that day)–thought about how awful that must be, a stroke or something similar disabling the pilot suddenly. There wasn’t too much discussion going on on the bus, but I did think it odd that as I passed though the AmTrak atrium at 30th Street Station on my way to the local train out to Radnor, how so many of the scheduled departures, particularly to New York, were being suddenly cancelled…and the R5 train stopped twice between stations, once as if sheltering in lace beneath a bridge, as, clearly, the regional rail honchos were as confused as anyone. And then onto the same office, albeit on the other side of the floor, as you, Jeff, only to begin a marathon of sudden changes to the national network television schedules and therefore to the affiliates…in that small measure, every broadcast station (down to low-power Home Shopping affiliates) that could get some corporate sibling to feed them some sort of news coverage, US, British or Canadian, was broadcasting thus, and would for several days…with the notable exception of PBS, my primary national responsibility (as was already yours at your end?}, where the primary stations were hoping to shelter children to some degree by keeping the regular feed of kids’ shows in place…while the smaller network PBSYOU (“Your Own University”), which also had been the primary source for extended PBS news coverage since its inception, took on that task…(YOU was defunded several years later, but much of its mission is reflected by the digital network World, now a secondary channel on many PBS stations). The tv in the cubicle across the aisle from mine where Beryl Shive had done her retirement job, just in front of Sue Tuttle’s and sharing a side wall with Tom Kraemer’s, was certainly playing out to the “network desk”…to say the least, on a macro and micro level, not a typical day at the office.

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